STAT

For good health, there’s no place like home

When low-income individuals get stable housing, their stress usually goes down and their health improves. It also reduces overall health care expenditures.
A woman walks up a staircase to her new apartment on move-in day after living in a homeless encampment in San Jose, Calif.

Jane (not her real name) walked into my office smiling, something I had never seen her do in the 18 months she had been coming to one of my hospital’s primary care clinics. “I have a home,” she almost shouted as she reached out to hug me.

Jane’s news was the happy conclusion of an extended and worrisome waiting period; her lack of stable housing had been taking a toll on her health and well-being.

When I first met Jane, she had

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