Popular Science

Scientists are solving the mystery of Earth’s thermostat

Our planet can control its climate—very slowly.
planet earth

We've only got one planet.

Pixabay

Life on Earth has survived vast changes in climate, from a warm period 450 million years ago, when most of the present-day United States was underwater, to the last ice age 20,000 years ago, when New England was buried beneath a mile-thick glacier. Though climate change triggered mass extinctions, life went on.

This is something of mystery. Runaway climate change turned Venus into a scorching hellscape, but Earth never grew so hot or cold that life failed to endure. Even in its most turbulent moments, our tiny planet remained a refuge, a blue-green lifeboat adrift against the vast hostility of space. Why?

Scientists have long speculated on the possibility of a planetary published in the journal provides the first-ever evidence of its existence.

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