Popular Science

This yarn makes its own electricity

Batteries not required.
flexible nanotube yarn

Coiled carbon nanotube yarns, created at the University of Texas at Dallas and imaged here with a scanning electron microscope, generate electrical energy when stretched or twisted.

University of Texas at Dallas

In the future, your workout—or your workout gear, to be precise—might generate enough energy to charge your . Researchers from the University of Texas at Dallas and South Korea’s Hanyang University (among other institutions) into yarn, forming what they call a “twistron harvester,” they can harness mechanical energy and turn it into electricity. They published their results this week in the journal .

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