NPR

Baltimore Took Down Confederate Monuments. Now It Has To Decide What To Do With Them

Speaking about monument removals across the U.S., Mayor Catherine Pugh says, "They're coming down so fast, I don't know if we have enough museums to house them or enough cemeteries to stick them in."
Baltimore removed four statues with Confederate ties on Aug. 16 under the cover of darkness, in a five-hour operation ordered by Mayor Catherine Pugh. Source: Merrit Kennedy

If you walked into Baltimore's Wyman Park Dell two weeks ago, a statue of Confederate Gens. Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson on horseback would have towered above you.

There's an inscription on the base that reads, "They were great generals and Christian soldiers and waged war like gentlemen." But now, there's nothing atop the pedestal except for a few potted plants.

On Aug. 16, under the cover of darkness, Baltimore removed four statues of figures with Confederate ties in a five-hour operation ordered by Mayor Catherine Pugh.

The Lee-Jackson statue and three others are now in a city lot,

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