The New York Times

The Long-Term Health Consequences of Hurricane Harvey

(The Upshot: The New Health Care)

Long after the floodwaters recede, and even during cleanup and rebuilding, the people who lived through Hurricane Harvey will face another form of recovery — from the storm’s blows to physical and mental health.

The short-term health effects of floods capture our attention. Harvey has already caused dozens of deaths, and in 2005 Hurricane Katrina killed more than 1,800 people.

Yet people endure injuries and illnesses in numbers that far exceed the death toll. When Hurricane Iniki hit Hawaii in 1992,

This article originally appeared in .

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