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Harvey Feel Like Katrina Déjà Vu? Not So Fast

As Houston starts to recover from the flooding, many see similarities between the two massive hurricanes and the damage they wrought. But there are some key differences.
(Left) Flooded neigborhoods can be seen in New Orleans in 2005. (Right) Flooded homes are shown near Lake Houston following Hurricane Harvey on Aug. 30. / Win McNamee / Getty Images

In 2005, when the most destructive and costliest natural disaster in the history of the United States struck New Orleans, tens of thousands of people would wait out the rebuilding of their city in Houston. Now it's Houston's moment in history to recover from an epic inundation.

Déjà vu is understandable. This week, we watch images of residents sloshing out of submerged neighborhoods, a convention center turned into an

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