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How to install Android Oreo on your phone right now

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Android Oreo

Don't wait around for Android Oreo to become widely available.

David Nield/Popular Science

Android 8.0 Oreo is here—and by "here," we mean it's rolling out only to Google-produced devices, phones that run the stock, unmodified version of Android. Essentially, only those who own Google Pixel phones, the recent Google Nexus phones, and a couple of tablets can access it easily.

Which is a pity, because Oreo offers goodies such as an improved notification system, picture-in-picture support for any app, and better battery life management. If you're eager to install it on your own device and play around with the new operating system, you can take some shortcuts. However, your options will depend on the type of phone you own: This guide primarily applies to Pixel and Nexus users, but it does include a course of action for other phones.

Android Oreo

Android 8.0 is on its way—for some devices.

David Nield/Popular Science

Why can't you access Oreo more easily? Unfortunately, new updates can take a long time to on around 13.5 percent of Android devices worldwide. Its predecessor, 6.0 Marshmallow, has reached 32 percent of Android users.

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