NPR

If You Think Everyone Else Has More Friends, You're Not Alone

Many first-year college students think their peers have more friends than they do, a study finds. But that can actually help motivate students to make new connections.
Source: Tim Ellis

When you feel like everyone around you is having more fun and spending more time with friends, it can make you feel bad about yourself — even if it's not true.

But according to Ashley Whillans, an assistant professor at Harvard Business School who studies how our view of the world affects our view of ourselves, this perception can challenge us to become more social and make more friends.

This fear of missing out on parties or

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