Futurity

What we learn by tracking gifted kids for 45 years

"We just need to realize that these kids are as different from the norm as kids with special needs are."

In the early 1970s, gifted programs were in their infancy, and nobody asked 13-year-olds to take the SAT.

That didn’t stop Julian Stanley, who launched the Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth (SMPY) near the end of his career at Johns Hopkins University.

“I wanted to do a longitudinal study of these kids that I wanted to continue, surveying them and learning about them, throughout their life—at least that was the idea,” recalls Camilla Benbow, dean of education and human development at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody School, who worked with Stanley as a graduate student.

The researchers did in fact follow up with a cohort of gifted children, giving them surveys throughout their lives. This short film traces the study’s origins and its findings.

“Different kids need different opportunities,” explains David Lubinski, professor of psychology and human development and co-director with Benbow of SMPY.

“We just need to realize that these kids are as different from the norm as kids with special needs are—and that we need to be responsive to their learning needs,” adds Benbow.

Source: Vanderbilt University

The post What we learn by tracking gifted kids for 45 years appeared first on Futurity.

More from Futurity

Futurity3 min read
Racial Achievement Gap Tracks With School Discipline Gap
An increase in the discipline gap or the academic achievement gap between black and white students in the US predicts a jump in the other, a new study shows. Similarly, as one gap narrows, so does the other. Students of color are suspended at disprop
Futurity3 min read
Piranhas Lose And Regrow A Bunch Of Teeth All At Once
Piranhas lose all of the teeth on one side of their mouth at once and regrow them, new research affirms. This presumably happens to replace dulled teeth with brand new sharp spears for gnawing on prey. Years ago, scientists discovered that piranhas l
Futurity3 min readTech
AR System Lets Users Reach Out And Grab Virtual Stuff
With a new software system, users can view augmented reality objects through their phones and use their hands to manipulate those objects as if they were real. The developers hope their software, called Portal-ble, could be a tool for artists, design