NPR

After Hurricane Katrina, Many People Found New Strength

A long-term study of people who survived Hurricane Katrina found that most were doing well, and some feel the experience transformed them. But others remain haunted by anxiety and depression.
A Houston resident walks through waist-deep water while evacuating her home after severe flooding following Hurricane Harvey in north Houston. / Win McNamee / Getty Images

Long after the floodwaters recede and the debris is cleared, the mental health impacts of disasters like hurricanes can linger.

Psychologist Jean Rhodes of the University of Massachusetts-Boston has spent more than a decade studying what happens to people years after a natural disaster — in this case, Hurricane Katrina.

She and her team had been studying the health of young parents attending community college in New Orleans starting.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR4 min readScience
The TB That Afflicts Much Of The World Was Likely Spread By Europeans
A new study looks at how tuberculosis has traveled the world — and the lessons that can be learned about treatment of drug-resistant forms.
NPR4 min readPolitics
Legal Battle Over Missouri Clinic Could Foretell Abortion Fights In Other States
Two rules have forced closure of all but one Planned Parenthood center in the state. Abortion-rights supporters say it is an example of an "abortion desert" that could result if Roe is overturned.
NPR2 min readPolitics
Episode 870: Trump vs. Red Tape
Every hero has a nemesis. Tom had Jerry. Batman had the Joker. Politicians are no different. Basically every candidate who has ever run for office targets the same enemy: Regulations. Red tape. Rules churned out by the federal bureaucracy that touch