STAT

6 things that happen at TV hospitals that don’t happen in real life

Medical storylines have always riveted viewers, and TV writers and directors have had to navigate the age-old tension between truth and storytelling.
Television shows like "ER" have had a number of fantastical storylines over the years.

Medical storylines have riveted television viewers since the earliest days of the medium — and for just as long, TV writers and directors have had to navigate the age-old tension between truth and storytelling.

One early solution, beginning in the 1950s, was a group of doctors who advised television producers directly. The group, known as the Physician’s Advisory Committee (PAC) on Television, Radio, and Motion Pictures, reviewed scripts, helped find props, and showed actors how to properly hold a scalpel.

Both medicine and television have changed a lot since then. Production companies now hire their own medical consultants. And the widespread availability of medical information means that TV shows must work harder

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from STAT

STAT5 min readSociety
Opinion: Eliminating ‘Tensions’ In Health Care: A Litmus Test For Innovation
The challenge in applying the term innovation in health care is that the relationship between the "buyer" (patient) and the "seller" (provider) is convoluted by many other players.
STAT8 min readSociety
Mental Health Apps Are Scooping Up Your Most Sensitive Data. Will You Benefit?
Mental health apps can put patients’ privacy at risk, and makers of some tools are using the data collected to create products that have nothing to do with health care.
STAT4 min read
Opinion: National Support For ‘Red-flag’ Gun Laws Could Prevent Many Suicides
While red-flag gun laws might prevent some mass shootings, they would spare many more lives from suicide. Their impact would be greatly magnified if mental health providers were allowed to…