The Guardian

Why, exactly, would anyone want to use AI to decide whether I’m gay or straight? | Matthew Todd

Stanford research raises the nightmarish prospect of authoritarian governments scanning faces to determine people’s sexuality. We need to be on guard
‘There are 72 countries where same-sex sexual activity is illegal, eight where it is punishable by death.’ Photograph: Alamy

Researchers at Stanford University claimed to have found that computer of people from photographs of their faces. Their programme was able to detect, with surprising accuracy, from more than 300,000 dating website images, who was gay and who straight. The computers were more successful at getting the sexuality of men right – 81% of the time from one picture, 91% after analysing five pictures. With women it was still impressive; 71% correct from analysing one

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