NPR

iPhone X's Face ID Inspires Privacy Worries — But Convenience May Trump Them

Advocates are concerned facial scan data could be stolen, or that a successful rollout could make consumers more comfortable with less innocuous, less accurate uses of facial recognition technology.

A feature of Apple's new high end iPhone X called Face ID — the phone will unlock when you look at it, or rather when it looks at you — has got privacy advocates nervous.

The new feature set off a fairly on Twitter with jibes such as "Face ID is the worst thing to happen to Beverly Hills plastic surgeons." But

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