The Atlantic

What Would a Hydrogen Bomb Do to the Pacific Ocean?

A North Korean official has hinted about conducting a nuclear test at sea, which would have severe environmental consequences.
Source: Handout / Reuters

The latest fiery exchange between the United States and North Korea has produced a new kind of threat. On Tuesday, during his speech at the United Nations, President Trump said his government would “totally destroy North Korea” if necessary to defend the United States or its allies. On Friday, Kim Jong Un responded, saying North Korea “will consider with seriousness exercising of a corresponding, highest level of hard-line countermeasure in history.”

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