Fortune

APPLE REBOOTS IN CHINA

FACING FALLING SALES IN A KEY MARKET, THE IPHONE MAKER TURNS TO STAR ENGINEER ISABEL GE MAHE TO LEAD A TURNAROUND.
STATUS SYMBOL The entrance to an Apple Store in Shanghai.

SHE WAS PROMISED dinner. In early 2008, Apple CEO Steve Jobs asked Isabel Ge Mahe over to his house to talk and share a meal. The invitation was part of Apple’s ongoing effort to recruit Mahe, who at the time was vice president of wireless software engineering at Palm Inc. The engineer-on-the-rise was hesitant to make a move. “I had built the wireless technology team for Palm pretty much from the ground up, and, at the time, we were trying to revive the Palm brand,” she says. Jobs, unsurprisingly, was unwilling to take no for an answer. So he decided to make his pitch in person. Mahe was impressed with how “down-to-earth” the late Apple cofounder was face

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Fortune

Fortune6 min read
Silicon Valley: The Exit Interview
THERE’S A REASON Silicon Valley worked from the moment it premiered on HBO in 2014: It was only about the pursuit of tech greatness and never ever about icky stuff like office romances or boring backstories. The critically acclaimed comedy, which air
Fortune3 min readPolitics
The Great Big Billionaire Backlash
AMERICANS DON’T HATE WEALTH. They hate injustice. Those facts are worth remembering as we enter this election year and try to understand America’s schizoid attitude toward billionaires, three of whom are running for President. It’s an attitude worth
Fortune2 min read
The Year of the CEO Exodus
CEO DEPARTURES through November rose 12% year-on-year to 1,480, according to executive outplacement firm Challenger Gray & Christmas. That was only four exits shy of the record set in 2008, during the turmoil of the global financial crisis. Since Nov