Newsweek

Trump Can Destroy N. Korea's Nukes Without a Land War

Want to win a nuclear war? Build better hackers, not better bombs.
A combination of portraits of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and of U.S. President Donald Trump.
05_02_Kim Jong Un and Donald Trump_01

In the long view of history, North Korea getting a nuclear-tipped intercontinental missile in 2017 is the rough equivalent of an army showing up for World War II riding horses and shooting muskets.

Nukes are so last century. War is changing, driven by cyberweapons, artificial intelligence (AI) and robots. Weapons of mass destruction are dumb, soon to be whipped by smart weapons of pinpoint disruption—which nations can use without risking annihilation of the human race.

If the U.S. is innovative and forward-thinking, it can develop technology that ensures no ill-behaving government could ever get a nuke off the by a small furry mammal.

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