Los Angeles Times

Stephen King, the 'It' guy: The author is perpetually popular in Hollywood, but with so many adaptations coming, he's really hot

Pop culture is in the midst of a full-on Stephen King boom. Again.

On the heels of the historic box office success of Warner Bros.' $478 million-grossing "It" remake - now the biggest R-rated horror movie in history - come a cluster of King adaptations led by Netflix's "Gerald's Game" and "1922," Audience network's "Mr. Mercedes" and Hulu's upcoming "Castle Rock."

One could argue that Hollywood has never not been in the throes of one long and sustained King obsession. His 54 novels and nearly 200 short stories have been adapted into more than 60 feature films and dozens of television projects, since "Carrie" first christened the Stephen King Cinematic Universe in 1976 in a glorious shower of pig's blood.

Our current moment of King mania is fed by multiple generations of filmmakers weaned on the yarns of the horror author. "Gerald's Game"

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

Related Interests

More from Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times5 min readPolitics
Trump's Go-to Foil: Big Cities
WASHINGTON - One of the most arresting images of Donald Trump's inaugural address in 2017 was a grim portrait of urban America, riddled by poverty, gangs, drugs and other blight. "Mothers and children trapped in poverty in our inner cities, rusted-ou
Los Angeles Times3 min read
Another Horse Dies At Santa Anita; 31 Thoroughbreds Have Died At Track Since Dec. 26
LOS ANGELES - Less than two weeks before the start of perhaps the most important meeting in Santa Anita's history, there was a fatality during training Monday at the Arcadia facility. Zeke, a 4-year-old gelding for trainer Dean Pederson, was working
Los Angeles Times5 min readPolitics
Minority Contractors Claiming To Be 'Native American' To Undergo Nationwide Review
Federal, state and local authorities are intensifying scrutiny of minority contracting programs across the country in the wake of a Los Angeles Times investigation that found that companies received more than $300 million in government contracts base