Los Angeles Times

Stephen King, the 'It' guy: The author is perpetually popular in Hollywood, but with so many adaptations coming, he's really hot

Pop culture is in the midst of a full-on Stephen King boom. Again.

On the heels of the historic box office success of Warner Bros.' $478 million-grossing "It" remake - now the biggest R-rated horror movie in history - come a cluster of King adaptations led by Netflix's "Gerald's Game" and "1922," Audience network's "Mr. Mercedes" and Hulu's upcoming "Castle Rock."

One could argue that Hollywood has never not been in the throes of one long and sustained King obsession. His 54 novels and nearly 200 short stories have been adapted into more than 60 feature films and dozens of television projects, since "Carrie" first christened the Stephen King Cinematic Universe in 1976 in a glorious shower of pig's blood.

Our current moment of King mania is fed by multiple generations of filmmakers weaned on the yarns of the horror author. "Gerald's Game"

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