NPR

Facebook, Google Spread Misinformation About Las Vegas Shooting. What Went Wrong?

The platforms promoted the name of a man falsely accused of being the shooter by surfacing less-credible sites. The companies say they're working on fixes, but analysts say the challenge is massive.
Police form a perimeter around the road leading to the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino after a gunman killed 59 people and injured more than 500 others when he opened fire Sunday night on a country music concert in Las Vegas. / MARK RALSTON / Getty Images

In the hours just after the massacre in Las Vegas, some fake news starting showing up on Google and Facebook. A man was falsely accused of being the shooter. His name bubbled up on Facebook emergency sites and when you searched his name on Google, links of sites connecting him with the shooting topped the first page.

It appears to be another case of automation working so fast that humans can't

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