NPR

President Johnson's Crime Commission Report, 50 Years Later

The 1960s brought political and social change in the U.S. — and more crime. Lyndon Johnson decided to wage a "war on crime" and formed a group tasked with developing revolutionary recommendations.
The Addison Consolidated Dispatch Center in Illinois is one of hundreds of 911 emergency call centers located across the country that are legacies of the 1967 Johnson Crime Commission. Source: Cheryl Corley

If you've ever called 911 to report an emergency, thank the Johnson Crime Commission. Establishing a national emergency number was just one of more than 200 recommendations the Commission offered up in a landmark 1967 report "for a safer and more just society."

Two years earlier, President Lyndon Johnson had appointed lawyers, educators, law enforcement officers, social workers and others – 19 members in all — to the group officially called the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice. The 1960s was a turbulent decade, and crime had been a

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