Popular Science

Scientists are trying to figure out how to keep bacteria from running rampant on space missions

Researchers monitored microbes on a mock flight to Mars.
astronaut on the ISS

Humans aren't the only living things on the ISS. The microbes we bring with us can potentially cause harm.

NASA

Space missions are meticulously planned. To ensure that nothing goes awry, the crew and those on the ground account for everything that enters and exits the craft. But there are a few stowaways they can't control: the bacteria that astronauts bring with them. Though undetectable to the naked eye, these tiny organisms have the potential to

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