Popular Science

We could actually learn a lot by going back to the Moon

But we’ll have to get there first.
crater moon

The Schrodinger basin on the Moon.

The Moon hangs luminous, beautiful, and just out of humanity’s reach in the sky, just like it’s been for the past 45 years—since the last astronaut lifted his foot off the lunar surface and headed back down to Earth.

Earlier this month, Vice President Mike Pence announced to send humans back to the Moon for an extended period of time, without outlining a specific plan for and equipping the expensive endeavor. NASA has to come up with a plan that includes lunar exploration.

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