NPR

Chicago's Jewish Community Unites To Be More Inclusive Of People With Disabilities

Houses of worship struggle with how to be inclusive of people with disabilities. An ambitious effort in Chicago is part of a nation-wide movement to help synagogues be more welcoming.
Members of North Suburban Synagogue Beth El in Highland Park, Ill., at a "Mitzvah Day" earlier this year, a day when families participated in projects to help others. Source: Courtesy Monique Parsons

There's a verse from the biblical prophet Isaiah carved into the walls of many synagogues: "My house shall be called a house of prayer for all people." These wall inscriptions are a reminder to be welcoming to everyone. But one in five Jewish families includes someone with a disability, and many of them say synagogues aren't reaching out to them.

A new project in Chicago aims to change that. The region's Jewish community is working together

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