NPR

Troubled By Flint Water Crisis, 11-Year-Old Girl Invents Lead-Detecting Device

The Colorado seventh-grader was unimpressed by the options her parents had to test water in their home. So she created a sensor-based device using chemically treated carbon nanotubes to do it faster.
Gitanjali Rao, 11, says she was appalled by the drinking water crisis in Flint, Mich. — so she designed a device to test for lead faster. She was named "America's Top Young Scientist" on Tuesday at the 3M Innovation Center in St. Paul, Minn. Source: Andy King

When the drinking water in Flint, Mich., became contaminated with lead, causing a major public health crisis, 11-year-old Gitanjali Rao took notice.

"I had been following the Flint, Michigan, issue for about two years," the seventh-grader told ABC News. "I was appalled by the number of people affected by lead contamination in water."

She saw her parents testing the water in their own home in Lone Tree, Colo.,.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR3 min readPolitics
Democrats Say Ambassador William Taylor's Testimony On Ukraine Is 'Disturbing'
Longtime diplomat Taylor is testifying on Capitol Hill as part of the House impeachment inquiry. Details are not yet public, but Democrats say Taylor's account squares with their allegations.
NPR1 min read
Jimmy Carter Fractures Pelvis, Is Hospitalized After Fall
The former president, 95, was admitted to a Georgia hospital "for observation and treatment of a minor pelvic fracture," the Carter Center says. It adds that Carter "is in good spirits."
NPR4 min read
Viking's Choice: New Sounds Now, New Sounds Forever
Music moves culture forward. Auditory illusions, hellish black metal and meditative drum-dance music mix together on this week's playlist.