Newsweek

How Did Life Start? Crashing Meteorites Could Be Cause

It's one of the biggest questions in science today—which means there's lots to argue about.
If a new paper is right, the first life on Earth could have formed in a pond like this one.
10_02_warm_little_pond Source: Ben K.D. Pearce, McMaster University

Long before there were humans, or hominins, or even single-celled creatures, there must have been something that sparked life on Earth and became everything we see around us today. On that much, scientists agree—but how precisely life began is far from settled.

tries to answer that question with math. It analyzes one of the two leading scenarios: that meteorites streaming in from the solar system deposited the building blocks of store information and oversee the construction of other molecules.

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