The Christian Science Monitor

'The Second Coming of the KKK' explores the largely forgotten 1920s resurgence of the Klan

In the years after the Civil War, the Ku Klux Klan rose from the bitterness and racism of the South to claim the mantle of American white supremacy. We think of this era when we picture hooded men on horses who burn crosses and lynch people.

But there's another KKK that's largely forgotten today, a national phenomenon in the Roaring Twenties that transformed Klan members and their allies into mayors, governors, and U.S. senators in states from Oregon and Colorado to Indiana and Maine.

Boosted by savvy marketing, shameless

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor6 min read
Privacy, Accuracy, And The Looming 2020 Census
Census Bureau decision to adopt a more rigorous system to ensure privacy for survey participants has some concerned about the accuracy of data.
The Christian Science Monitor10 min read
Will Hawaii Lead The Renewable Revolution?
Hawaii has positioned itself as a pioneer in the quest to move toward a fossil fuel-free future. Its path may hold lessons for the rest of the U.S.
The Christian Science Monitor3 min readPolitics
Diplomacy: When A Winner-take-all Approach Risks Losing Big
US President Trump and British Prime Minister Johnson have raised expectations of diplomatic wins on their terms. But their approach may be shifting.