TIME

The Saudi Crown Prince’s plot to reshape the Middle East backfires

Posters of Lebanon’s leader Saad Hariri with the caption #WE_ARE_ALL_SAAD in Beirut on Nov. 10

EVER SINCE LEBANESE PRIME Minister Saad Hariri abruptly resigned during a visit to Saudi Arabia on Nov. 4, he has struggled to assure his people—and the world—that he was not coerced, that he is not being held in the capital Riyadh against his will and that he is not a mere pawn in Saudi Arabia’s enduring quest to isolate archrival Iran. Few believe him.

That a Lebanese politician should be targeted

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