The Guardian

Drug traffickers taught the rich how to hide money in tax havens | Roberto Saviano

Legal capitalism has learned from criminal capitalism that in the world of money, only rule breakers survive, writes mafia expert Roberto Saviano
HAMILTON, BERMUDA - NOVEMBER 8: A view of Hamilton Harbour at dusk, November 8, 2017 in Hamilton, Bermuda. In a series of leaks made public by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, the Paradise Papers shed light on the trillions of dollars that move through offshore tax havens. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

It was only 19 months ago that the Panama Papers were released. Now, it’s the Paradise Papers that are filling the front pages of English and European newspapers. Back when the Panama Papers were released, I wrote that if David Cameron’s name hadn’t been in those documents, the news probably wouldn’t have had the same impact. Today I think that if Queen Elizabeth’s name hadn’t come up, we likely wouldn’t be discussing it either.

The mechanisms are the same.

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