The New York Times

America's Statue Wars Are a Family Feud

ARGUMENTS ON WHICH MONUMENTS COME DOWN WILL SURELY LAY BARE WHAT AN EXASPERATING COUNTRY GENERAL LEE FAILED TO DESTROY.

Bozeman, Montana — Just as citizens suspected of conspiring with foreign governments should be investigated and prosecuted in the present, those who committed treason in the past need not be glorified. What could be more logical than taxpayers’ patriotic plea that their federal, state and municipal governments consider removing, from public property, tributes to traitors loyal to the Confederate States of America who took up arms against the United States to perpetuate the institution of slavery?

I have no qualms about tearing down bronze Confederates on government land. And I descend from one of those men. My paternal great-great-grandfather Stephen Nila Carlile served as a private

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