NPR

'I Don't Believe In Science,' Says Flat-Earther Set To Launch Himself In Own Rocket

"Mad" Mike Hughes plans to take the rocket built from salvaged metal on a flight across the Mojave Desert on Saturday. His stated mission: to overturn two millennia of scientific understanding.

On Saturday, a limousine driver plans to launch himself on a mile-long flight over the Mojave Desert in a rocket of his own making.

His name is "Mad" Mike Hughes, his steam-powered rocket is built of salvaged metals, his launchpad is repurposed from a used mobile home — and he is confident this will mark the first step toward proving the Earth is flat, after all.

"It's the most interesting story in of his jury-rigged quest to overturn more than two millennia of scientific knowledge. And the whole thing is costing him just $20,000, according to the AP. (It goes without saying, but we'll say this anyway: )

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR3 min readSociety
'A Small Part Of A Serious Problem': Criminals Hired As Police Officers In Alaska
A joint investigation by the Anchorage Daily News and ProPublica found that in one town, every officer had been convicted of domestic violence within the last 10 years.
NPR3 min readPolitics
Equifax To Pay Up To $700 Million In Data Breach Settlement
The credit reporting agency will pay up to $700 million in fines and monetary relief to consumers over a 2017 data breach that affected nearly 150 million people.
NPR2 min read
Art Neville, A New Orleans Icon, Dead At 81
The keyboardist and singer was the co-founder of both the Meters and the Neville Brothers died Monday — bands that took the funk and swagger of New Orleans to a much larger world.