NPR

'I Don't Believe In Science,' Says Flat-Earther Set To Launch Himself In Own Rocket

"Mad" Mike Hughes plans to take the rocket built from salvaged metal on a flight across the Mojave Desert on Saturday. His stated mission: to overturn two millennia of scientific understanding.

On Saturday, a limousine driver plans to launch himself on a mile-long flight over the Mojave Desert in a rocket of his own making.

His name is "Mad" Mike Hughes, his steam-powered rocket is built of salvaged metals, his launchpad is repurposed from a used mobile home — and he is confident this will mark the first step toward proving the Earth is flat, after all.

"It's the most interesting story in of his jury-rigged quest to overturn more than two millennia of scientific knowledge. And the whole thing is costing him just $20,000, according to the AP. (It goes without saying, but we'll say this anyway: )

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