NPR

Sole Defendant In Benghazi Attacks Convicted Of Terrorism Charges — But Not Murder

Ahmed Abu Khatallah was accused of orchestrating the siege on a U.S. diplomatic compound in the Libyan city. That attack, which left four Americans dead, has become a political flashpoint in the U.S.

Updated at 5:30 p.m. ET

More than five years after militants stormed a U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi, killing four Americans including the ambassador, the Libyan man charged with orchestrating the siege has been convicted of terrorism charges. Yet in its verdict Tuesday, the jury acquitted Ahmed Abu Khatallah of the most serious charges against him, including murder.

Khatallah remains the sole suspect charged for the deadly siege "he conspired with others to attack the facilities, kill U.S. citizens, destroy buildings and other property, and plunder materials, including documents, maps and computers containing sensitive information."

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