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Automation Could Displace 800 Million Workers Worldwide By 2030, Study Says

But in the long term, new technology could create more jobs than it eliminates, a new report says. It says governments and businesses have to prioritize retraining workers for the new economy.
Employees work on automobile parts at a production line at the BMW factory in Shenyang, China, on Nov. 22. Twelve percent of workers in China could need to switch jobs by 2030, researchers say. Source: AFP/Getty Images

A coming wave of job automation could force between 400 million and 800 million people worldwide out of a job in the next 13 years, according to a new study.

from the research arm of the consulting firm McKinsey & Company forecasts scenarios in which 3 percent to 14 percent of workers around the world — in 75 million to 375 million

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