NPR

Across The World, If You Eat For Your Health, You'll Help The Planet

Dozens of countries have government-recommended diets. That advice differs from country to country, but according to a new study, following it generally would help the environment.
Brahman cattle graze in a field in Innisfail, Queensland, Australia. Researchers can estimate the greenhouse gas emissions and land used to produce various foods in different parts of the world. They've used that data to calculate the environmental impact of a shift in what people eat. Source: David Messent

Telling people what to eat is perilous, whether the advice is aimed at a friend or an entire country. Of course, people and governments do it anyway. Dozens of countries have come up with recommendations for the perfect, most health-promoting diet.

Those recommendations are aimed at improving people's health. But Paul Behrens, a researcher at the University of Leiden, in the Netherlands, wanted to know whether this

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