The Paris Review

Redux: P. D. James, Walter Mosley, Georges Simenon

Every week, the editors of The Paris Review lift the paywall on a selection of interviews, stories, poems, and more from the magazine’s archive. You can have these unlocked pieces delivered straight to your inbox every Sunday by signing up for the Redux newsletter.   This week, in 1887, Sherlock Holmes made. The very same same week, in 1926, Agatha Christie disappeared for eleven days. Call it coincidence, if you like. We call it an excuse to bring you three interviews about detective fiction, with , , and .

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