The Paris Review

Joy Williams Will Receive Our 2018 Hadada Award

Joy Williams, 1990. Photo by Reg Innell

Save the date: The Paris Review will honor Joy Williams with the Hadada Award for lifetime achievement at our annual gala, the Spring Revel.

Williams is the author of five short-story collections, four described as “one of the best guidebooks ever written”). Williams’s writing first appeared in our Fall 1968 issue with the short story “.” In 1973, George Plimpton decided to published her first novel, , under the Paris Review Editions imprint; the novel was nominated for the National Book Award when Williams was only thirty. Over the decades, the  has published nine of her stories (and will publish a tenth this spring).

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