The New York Times

Why I Can No Longer Call Myself an Evangelical Republican

There are times in life when the institutional ground underneath you begins to crumble — and, with it, long-standing attachments. Such is the case for me when it comes to the Republican Party and evangelicalism.

I’ve been a part of both for my entire adult life. These days, though, in many important ways, they are having harmful effects on our society.

The latest example is in Alabama, where Roy Moore, the Republican Senate candidate, stands accused of varying degrees of sexual misconduct by nine women, including one who was 14 years old at the time. Moore leads in most polls, and solidly among most evangelicals, heading into Tuesday’s election.

A bit of personal history may be in order here. As a young man, I embraced conservatism

This article originally appeared in .

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