Bloomberg Businessweek

Hitting Polluters Where It Hurts Most

China’s Blue Map app shames dirty factories—risking their Apple contracts
Ma Jun

Ma Jun’s years as an environmental activist taught him this lesson: If you want factories to clean up their act, shaming them in front of Apple Inc. and Wal-Mart Stores Inc. works better than government fines. Ma’s strategy, backed financially by Alibaba Group Holding Ltd.’s charitable arm, is to scrape real-time data off government websites that compile readings from effluent monitoring equipment at some 13,000 of the worst water polluters. The software aggregates the data on an app called Blue Map, where the public

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