Los Angeles Times

Wary of Trump, some foreign-born tech workers choose Canada, not Silicon Valley

Petra Axolotl knew her chances of getting an H-1B visa were slim. She had an MBA from Wharton and a job offer at Twitter, but luck would decide the Dutch data scientist's fate - and in 2016, it did not fall in her favor.

Axolotl missed out in the lottery for the coveted visa but remained determined to work in Silicon Valley, a place she considered the global capital of tech innovation. The plan was to reapply this year.

Then Donald Trump became president, and prepared to move somewhere else ––Canada.

Unlike many liberal-leaning technology workers in Silicon Valley, Axolotl

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