The Atlantic

Why We Should Be Worried about a War in Space

There aren't enough rules governing military behavior in the upper atmosphere.
Source: Reuters

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One hundred miles above the Earth’s surface, orbiting the planet at thousands of miles per hour, the six people aboard the International Space Station enjoy a perfect isolation from the chaos of earthly conflict. Outer space has never been a military battleground. But that may not last forever. The over whether to create a Space Corps comes at a time when governments around. No longer confined to the , space warfare is likely on the horizon.

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