NPR

PHOTOS: Animals That Could Disappear Because Of Us

And the well-being of humans could suffer if the species go extinct. The images are from a new book, 'Endangered,' by Tim Flach.
The Philippine eagle Pithecophaga jefferyi faces extinction from mining, pollution and poaching. Source: Tim Flach

Earth is facing an extinction crisis – and humans shoulder the blame.

Wildlife poaching and illegal trade. Climate change. Urbanization. Mining. These are some of the myriad things we do that endanger animals and, in the process, damage our own well-being.

Three-quarters of the earth's estimated 8.7 million species are at risk, according to a 2011 study. Of course it's not always our fault, but even the most conservative estimates, like one published in a that uses the fossil record, suggest that the current extinction rate based on vertebrate data is up to a hundred times higher than it would be without human

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