Los Angeles Times

Editorial: If California is serious about climate change, the car can't be king of our roads

For decades, California's landmark environmental law has worked in a decidedly un-environmental way.

Enacted in 1970, the California Environmental Quality Act, or CEQA, was supposed to create an environmental review process for building projects and, in theory at least, ensure that new developments did a minimum of harm to the communities where they were located.

In many ways, it has been successful. But one of the law's requirements is an analysis of a project's impact on transportation.

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