NPR

Finding A Legal Loophole, Memphis Takes Down Its Confederate Statues

To skirt a state law prohibiting the monuments' removal, the city sold two of its parks to a new nonprofit. "In all of my life in Memphis, I've never seen such solidarity," said Mayor Jim Strickland.

It was a long time in the making, but when the statues of Confederate figures finally came down in Memphis, Tenn., it was quick work.

Yesterday, the city sold two of its city parks – one with a statue of Confederate president Jefferson Davis, the other featuring a statue of Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest on horseback — for $1,000 each.

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