Fortune

THE FOUR PILLARS OF MORAL LEADERSHIP

IN AN AGE WHERE THE RULES OF ENGAGEMENT SEEM EVER TO BE CHANGING, HERE ARE SOME GUIDING PRECEPTS THAT HAVE STOOD THE TEST OF TIME.
Seidman is interviewed by Fortune’s Alan Murray in December at the Fortune + TIME Global Forum in Rome.

THE ANIMATING SPIRIT OF BUSINESS has always been an ambition to do big things—to build something valuable, to solve a difficult problem, to provide a useful service, to explore the frontiers of human possibility. At its essence, therefore, business is about human endeavor. And for humans to endeavor together, there must be an animating ethos and ethic of endeavor.

But it’s getting harder for leaders to foster this ethos, and to lead through it on the way to doing big things. That’s because they’re trying to do so in a world that is not just rapidly changing, but in one that has been dramatically reshaped. And the world has been reshaped faster than we’ve been able to reshape ourselves, our institutions, and our models of leadership.

First, individuals around the world have gone from being merely connected a generation ago to globally interdependent today. The behavior of any one person can affect so many others, even those a continent away, as never before.

Second, technology is bringing strangers into intimate

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