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The Whoppers of 2017

President Trump monopolizes our list of the year’s worst falsehoods and bogus claims. The post The Whoppers of 2017 appeared first on FactCheck.org.

Summary

We first dubbed President Donald Trump, then just a candidate, as “King of Whoppers” in our annual roundup of notable false claims for 2015.

He dominated our list that year – and again in 2016 – but there was still plenty of room for others.

This year? The takeover is complete.

In his first year as president, Trump used his bully pulpit and Twitter account to fuel conspiracy theories, level unsubstantiated accusations and issue easily debunked boasts about his accomplishments.

And a chorus of administration officials helped in spreading his falsehoods.

Trump complained — without a shred of evidence — that massive voter fraud cost him the 2016 popular vote. He doubled down by creating the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity and appointing a vice chairman who falsely claimed to have “proof” that Democrats stole a U.S. Senate seat in New Hampshire.

Even as he mobilized the federal government to ferret out Democratic voter fraud, Trump refused to accept the U.S. intelligence community’s consensus finding that Russia interfered in the 2016 campaign.

Trump disparaged the “so-called ‘Russian hacking’” as a “hoax” and a “phony Russian Witch Hunt,” and compared the conduct of U.S. intelligence agencies to “Nazi Germany.” He then falsely accused the “dishonest” news media of making it “sound like I had a feud with the intelligence community.”

When he spoke of himself, Trump’s boastfulness went far beyond the facts.

He claimed that his inaugural crowd “went all the way back to the Washington Monument,” and sent out his press secretary to declare it the “largest audience to ever witness an inauguration, period, both in person and around the globe.” He described his tax plan as the “biggest tax cut in the history of our country,” and took credit for making the U.S. nuclear arsenal “far stronger and more powerful than ever” after seven months on the job. None of that was true.

Trump is clearly an outlier. If he and his aides were removed from our list, we would be left with a dozen or more notable falsehoods roughly equally distributed between the two parties. You’ll find those at the end of this very long list.

Forgive us for the length. But consider this: It could be even longer.

(And for a short summary on the highlights, see our video on six of these claims.)

Analysis

The Russia Investigation

Two weeks before Trump took the oath of office, the Office of the that described an “influence campaign” ordered by Russian President Vladimir Putin during the 2016 election.

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