The New York Times

For Doctors, Age May Be More Than a Number

A LACK OF EXPERIENCE IS NOT NECESSARILY A BAD THING.

When I went on Terry Gross’s radio show last year, the very first question she asked me was one I get asked during my work as a doctor all the time:

“Can I ask how old you are?”

“Twenty-nine.”

“So when family members or loved ones see you,” she went on, “do they ever look at you and go, ‘You’re so young, how can I trust you?'”

In many professions, a premium is placed on experience, with age often a surrogate

This article originally appeared in .

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