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Science Says That To Fight Ignorance, We Must Start By Admitting Our Own

The best way to defend everything we really do know, according to science, is to begin by admitting our own ignorance — to ask "What don't you know?" says astrophysicist Adam Frank.
Source: robuart

Science is not a philosophy or a spiritual path; it's a way of behaving in the world.

But since tribalism and polarization have made "alternative facts" a reality of public life, there is something we can learn from science to help us navigate the troubled waters and find a more resilient civic life.

The lesson begins with understanding the right relationship not to but to . To be blunt, if we want to fight

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