The Atlantic

'People Who Are Different Are Not the Problem in America'

Two members of the U.S. Senate urge Americans to honor the legacy of the Martin Luther King Jr. by engaging with others of different backgrounds.
Source: Carlo Allegri / Reuters

This year, Martin Luther King Jr. Day carries additional significance, as it marks the 50th anniversary of his tragic death. In April of 1968, King was killed in Memphis, Tennessee, at the hands of a ruthless murderer who was filled with hate and racism.

One of the reasons we, as Americans and citizens around the world, remember King’s legacy is his call to freedom and racial unity through love and engagement for all people—a message he still shares with the world

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