Los Angeles Times

From 'Black Panther' to 'Ready Player One': Hollywood places big bets on spring as the new launching point for blockbuster titles

For more than 40 years, Steven Spielberg's movies have followed a simple, binary release strategy. Without exception, his films have either opened in the summer - a moviegoing season he all but invented with the 1975 smash "Jaws" - or toward the end of the year as awards buzz is heating up. The formula is so predictable, you can almost set a watch by it.

Yet when executives at Warner Bros. sat down with the director to discuss the release plan for his latest film, the big-budget sci-fi-action epic "Ready Player One," they had something different in mind. Set in a near-future dystopia in which people live much of their lives in a virtual-reality realm called the OASIS, Spielberg's adaptation of Ernest Cline's bestselling novel has all the bells and whistles of a big, fun summer movie.

But the studio wanted to open it in March - a

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

Related Interests

More from Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times1 min read
LeBron James To Sit Out Lakers Game Against Warriors On Thursday
LOS ANGELES - LeBron James will not play in the Los Angeles Lakers' game against the Golden State Warriors on Thursday night in San Francisco. The team listed James as out because of strained groin. Anthony Davis is listed as probable after injuring
Los Angeles Times2 min read
California Coronavirus Case Could Be First Spread Within US Community, CDC Says
LOS ANGELES - The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating what could be the first case of novel coronavirus in the United States involving a patient who neither recently traveled out of the country nor was in contact with someone
Los Angeles Times6 min read
Who Is New Disney CEO Bob Chapek? He's No Bob Iger But He Is Steeped In Company's Culture
LOS ANGELES - Walt Disney Co.'s appointment of theme parks boss Bob Chapek as its new chief executive, replacing Bob Iger, took Hollywood and Wall Street by surprise. The decision, announced Tuesday, ended nagging speculation about the succession pla