NPR

A 'Fraught Time' For Press Freedom In The Philippines

President Duterte "does not like the press," writes Sheila S. Coronel, dean of academic affairs at Columbia University's journalism school. The Rappler news site is the government's latest target.
College students protest to defend press freedom in Manila on Wednesday, after the government cracked down on Rappler, an independent online news site. Source: Noel Celis

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte does not like the press. Stung by critical media reporting, he has in the past months called some of the country's largest media organizations "bullshit," "garbage," "son of a bitch." Journalists, he said, have no shame. They are corrupt fabulists and hypocrites who "pretend to be the moral torch of the country."

But Duterte does not just get mad; he gets even. This week, the Philippine Securities and Exchange Commission the corporate registration of , an online media startup that has reported aggressively on Duterte's troll army and

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