NPR

Turnover In Trump's White House Is 'Record-Setting,' And It Isn't Even Close

In Trump's first year in office 34 percent of top aides have either resigned, been fired or moved to different positions. That level of turmoil is off the charts compared with recent presidencies.
Of the people in this Oval Office photo from Jan. 28, 2017, only President Trump and Vice President Pence are still part of the administration. Reince Priebus, Steve Bannon, Sean Spicer and Michael Flynn have all left. Source: Drew Angerer

If President Trump's first year in office seemed chaotic from a staffing perspective, there's a reason. Turnover among top-level staff in the Trump White House was off the charts, according to a new Brookings Institution report.

Turnover in Trump's first year was more than triple that in former President Barack Obama's first year, and double the rate in President Ronald Reagan's White House. A full 34 percent of high-level White House aides either resigned, were fired or moved into different positions in this first year of the Trump presidency.

"While some turnover

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