Bloomberg Businessweek

Slot Machines For Millennials

Gamblit says its skill-based games will draw younger visitors to casinos

It’s one of the big dilemmas facing the $70 billion U.S. casino industry—how to get people in their 20s and 30s to play slot machines as much as their parents or grandparents. Generations raised on video games and smartphones don’t have the same interest in plopping themselves in front of screens when they’re out on the town. In Las Vegas, the percentage of visitors actually gambling is down, while the share going to nightclubs and other attractions is

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